For a chance's Entrepreneurs

Entrepreneurs in emerging countries

Inventions and entrepreneurs can save the world

with 3 comments

Good Morning friends,

With my first coffee in the morning,

Today I would like to talk about Jon Böhmer, inventor of the ” Kyoto box”.

fogaosolar

A solar cooker made from two cardboard boxes, is convinced that his invention will save many lives and many trees in the world.

Jon has been awarded by the Forum for the Future with  75.000 dollars  a few weeks ago with the creation  prototype the solar cooking soon become a reality in over twenty countries in Africa,Asia and Latin America.

Jon  BÖHNER Norwegian based in Kenya, says that thanks to its solar cooking will be allowed not to cut trees in many countries and also ended up  with the violations of women in the woods collecting  firewood and it allow to boil water very easy  . The difference with the  others  solar cooking is that it costs 4 eur .

Solving ecological,economic and efficient to generate energy in developing countries.

Best regards,

Mireya

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Written by forachance

28 April 2009 at 10:27

3 Responses

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  1. Those of us who have worked for years to promote awareness of solar cooking are thrilled at the prize won by Jon Bohmer for his solar cooker. The publicity it has generated will help raise the profile of this simple, powerful and renewable technology.

    It is however, not a ‘new invention’.

    The cardboard solar box cooker, for which Mr. Bohmer won $75,000 from the FT Climate Change Challenge is a variation on one of the many designs that have been freely available to the public for years on Solar Cookers International’s archive. http://solarcooking.org/. Take a look at the Heaven’s Flame solar box cooker http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/radabaugh30.html or the minimum solar box cooker http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/Minimum_Solar_Box_Cooker and the many other solar box cooker designs on our website.

    The archive website contains extensive data on the design, construction, dissemination and international use of solar cookers to reduce carbon emissions and deforestation.

    After logging on to the SCI web archive, users can click on build a solar cooker. There they will find detailed plans for a variety of cardboard, wood, metal and plastic solar box cookers, solar panel cookers and solar parabolic cookers.

    Solar cooker advocates like Mr. Bohmer who have been inspired by the many designs currently available on our website often come up with new variations and post them to our website where they can be shared with the rest of the world.

    The solar box cooker is the oldest type of solar cooker http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cooker. It was first widely promoted by two American women http://www.solarcookers.org/about/history.html who were among the founders of SCI in 1988. Our organization was initially know as Solar Box Cookers International. Another of SCI’s founders, Robert Metcalf has been traveling the world for decades teaching people how to build and use solar cookers not only for cooking but also for solar water pasteurization http://solarcooking.org/pasteurization/default.htm.

    When refugee populations in Africa began expanding in the early 1990s and access to cooking fuel and clean water became a serious problem for these people, a more portable version of the cardboard box solar cooker was developed by Roger Bernard. Tens of thousands of these have been made and sold or given away.

    The largest solar cooker project currently underway is in three Darfur refugee camps in Chad. The women in those camps have manufactured and distributed more than 30,000 cardboard and aluminum foil Cookits. Trips outside the camp to gather firewood have been reduced by 86%.

    Almost all solar cooker projects, including the one in Chad are currently funded by small non-profits. There is little to no government funding available. And yet many governments continue to subsidize the purchase of bottled cooking gas by up to 50% and the charcoal trade is destroying the forests of Africa and south Asia. This must change.

    Pat McArdle

    29 April 2009 at 11:14

  2. Hi, interesting post. I have been wondering about this topic,so thanks for sharing. I’ll definitely be coming back to your posts.

  3. Hi, cool post. I have been pondering this issue,so thanks for posting. I will definitely be subscribing to your blog. Keep up great writing


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